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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
that a crucial vote on egypt's constitution could be delayed. we've got the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian predent mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement his sweeping powers. earlier today protesters broke through the barriers around the presidential palace. police fired tear gas at a crowd of almost 1000 people out seed cairo tv studios. we have a fox news contributor, specializing in middleeast counterterrorism affairs. lisa, it looks like things are getting more out of control all the time. people keep saying ts is going to calm down. what is your, what is your take on it? >> well, as long as moi's factions, the muslim brotherhood will remain steadfast in a power grab d maintaining their agenda, the people, opposition saying this is not what we fought for the company will remain in perpetual rev
the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . [ abdul-raid ] i've been working since i was about 16. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ music is a universal language. but when i was in an accent... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i neverissed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people lookingut for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian president mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
as greece or portugal ornever, but they are just talking about a few ring keating billions. a trillion word is really unique to the united states. and i think that is what is going to kill us, the absolute numbers. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is passed. lou: the house passes the stem emigration
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
continues on. tom, likely they will get less. the pensions in greece were guaranteed by the government, ma were cut as much as 35%. so, when you have government intervene shin in whainterventia private market enterprise, the public get hurt. like all of these safety net programs, the entitlement programs, once the seed is planted, they are almost impossible to get rid of, and left with a multibillion dollar deficit like in this case. tom: fha, we got into the mortgage mess because people had no skin in the game to a greatic tent, no money down, little money down, 1% be 3%, that is what the fha is still doing, making loans with almost no money down. why do you not expect a problem? >> we have got a problem. in my opinion, we got into housing crisis because of government, and as the administration takes laps about their successful bailout of general motors, that we lost billions of dollars o as taxpayers, we still have fharc, ha and fannie and freddie. tom: it is both of them are amazing. when it comes to fha, how -- this could take years to work this without, like you said, fannie and fredd
, the people who are really going to be hurt are the poor. 25% unemployment in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average in the united states. we see pensions being cut without any notice hardly at all. social programs slashed. there is at least some probability that will happen to us. i will say it is a certainty eventually if we do not do something about the situation. i would think they would be much more sober in their demand. at this moment, i do not see it. >> i would say a lot of this is, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation. part of the disservice is the debate is having today is it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most depressing issue, i am more optimistic. it is steering the conversation away from that. it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. i do not think we have 25 years anymore. maybe it is two or five. we get closer and closer every year that we build up our debt and every year that we postpone tacklin
not become greece? it is interesting that we talked about the fiscal coordination have in the countries and to last come along and bail them out when they have not done what they're supposed to do? i do not know that we are that much different. we have a great panel. people thought are far smarter than i am. i will introduce them now. and then i will sit down and i did ask some questions to revival at the panel to keep their answers relatively short so we can run through a lot of questions and get out of here on time. we have ailson frasier, director of the institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues, including federal spending, taxes, the debt and deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor. next, rudy penner, the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair in public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long career, he was director of the congressional bu
, you see the fiscal catastrophe of greece, the fragile economics of other countries on the periphery, you see how it's possible for countries to blow it, to keep running up debt, keep spending more than they bring in. right now the world is looking at us, the whole world, by the way, people as far away as hong kong, people have to make sharp decisions about money and see if we, the americans, can be the deadline we set ourselves. can we do what arithmetic dictates and meet our own commitments can't we? i was out there pretty much alone about those wars with iraq, with warning about the weaknesses, political weaknesses of certain democrats over the years, but this fiscal cliff i say is for real. there on would be nothing but trouble if we go over it. even if we get to close to it. the president staked out his
read the newspapers, you see the fiscal catastrophe of greece. right now, the world is looking at us. the whole world. people as far away as hong kong. people have to make sharp decision about money and they are making to see if we americans can be the deadline. can we meet our own commitments? i have been alone in the role i've got here. i was alone about the wars in iraq. political weaknesses of certain democrats over the years. but this fiscal cliff is for real. nothing but trouble if we go over it. even if we get
. there are solutions to this. this is not europe. this is not greece. there are solutions. it's the politics that mess everything up. >> yeah. you're absolutely right. getting back to the issue of tax rates, it looked like we were getting closer. boehner offered to raise mate raitts for those making more than a million dollars a year, and the rate would only increase on the amount of money you earn over a million dollars a year. just raising those rates were a major concession for any republican. president obama, who insists on letting the bush tax cults expire for earns making more than $250,000, or at least that's how he presented it during the campaign, offered to let those taxes rise on those making more than $400,000 a year. we're talking marginal rates then so, that would be only on income above $400,000. by the way, mark, $370,000 a year is what puts you into the top 1% here. you're an economist. all those income levels, 250, 400, a million, flying around for raising rates, what in your opinion is the breakoff point at which raising rates would substantially hurt the economy? >> well, i mean, i
. greece and spain. liz: jeff looks like he's about to damage you. go ahead, jeff. >> are well, you know, they're going to make a deal in washington. i lived inside the beltway, have a pretty good network inside the beltway. cantor is worried -- excuse me, not cantor, boehner is worried about not being reelected as speaker of the house. they can't vote on that until january 4th with the new congress on that. cantor wants that job. so i think boehner's going to press for a deal, i think he's going to go ahead and allow president obama to raise taxes to 39.6%, and i think that'll take the edge off the fiscal cliff. david: let's take this discussion out of the beltway and into the real world. the economy, and, jeff, i want to start with you because you're bullish, but if you're so bullish, hy are you downgrading housing right now? >> because our housing team made a really good call on the housing stocks, and they outran their valuations on a short to intermediate-term basis. they downgraded them about two months ago. liz: okay, so where's the money? show it to us. >> i like just about ever
and to move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it's interesting that we talk about the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked
like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money by selling off assets including the aircraft leasing unit that complemented aig's airplane insurance business. if u.s. regulators apro s appro deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the
greece has gotten their fiscal house in order. >> 23 minutes past the hour your fox news minute and winter is here. severe winter weather across the midwest. blizzard conditions expected to disrupt travel plans for millions of americans that are heading out for the holidays, state from kansas to wisconsin and getting hit with massive amounts of snow and strong wind after several midwestern cities set records for the most consecutive days without any snow and a travel might barely getting worse as the weather system moved eastward. also newark, new jersey mayor cory booker-run for u.s. senate. the 43-year-old democrat breaking the news over twitter this morning, the sweet ending speculation over whether he would challenge chris christie next year, the new jersey republican whose approval rating had an all-time high after superstorm sandy. his second term as mayor ends in mid 2014. those your headlines. back to cheryl. cheryl: trying to get over those pictures oo the midwest. thank you very much. existing homes sales climbing at their fastest pace in three years of almost 6%, five
will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best fo
of its own. 7% like -- remember, the business is still majority in spain, italy, portugal, greece, et cetera. over 50% of sales. there 7% like for like. margins rising. it is a special company. >> taking a big -- are they taking a chunk of market share, as well? >> absolutely. i think it goes back to the strengths of its model. i think more than anyone else they listen to the consumer. this is fast fashion taken to the extreme. there's something new in the stores every two weeks. there's a reason to keep going every two weeks. they get feedback from the store managers quickly on what's working, what's not working. go back to the production people, say we need this more, we need less of this. >> the supply chain must be -- where are they making this stuff? how are they able to get it into the store so quick three is. >> about half of their production is in spain, portugal, and morocco. that's the secret really. unlike h&m et cetera who gave everything to the far east, inditex is doing quite a lot locally. that is the key challenge for them. as they get bigger and bigger, can they remai
the economic instability that we have in europe, as to what is happening in greece and we have our fiscal cliff here in the united states, what role do you see the council on foreign relations play in the overall big picture, especially helping to ease the situation of the economic problems in the united states? guest: the council on foreign relations is an independent, non-partisan organization that has nothing to do with the u.s. government other than the fact that our scholars try to help influence and educate the public. the government on foreign policy. the uprising in the arab world, to the caller's question, is happening in the worst of all possible times. the u.s. and strapped financially. europe is back in a recession and confronted with serious economic problems, but europe and the united states would, in the past, be the place that traditionally had helped to support economic change and prosperity in that part of the world. now what we're seeing are caught are countries like -- are countries like qatar in saudi arabia stepping in. again, the instability in the region is timed in perh
a self-induced one because of the fiscal cliff. it's not greece. it's not like the u.s. is being forced to act right now. the u.s. has a medium and long-term problem with entitlements and population. if politicians on both sides of the aisle could get together and kind of do a down payment for the long-term entitlement issue, that would give them the room to not only -- would there be sort of benefits from doing that, but also give them the room to not do so much tightening in the short term when the economy is weak. >> all right, zani, thank you so much. terrific insights. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> well, if you haven't done your christmas shopping yet, now is the time to panic. no, don't panic. our tech expert has some ideas. she'll show you the latest cool gadgets. >>> a look into what's next in the culinary world. cool tools and strong drinks. so we're going to make a drink called the thai basil dhaka re, and we use liquid nitrogen to freeze and crush up herbs. this is thai basil. here is the main part of the technique. pour liquid nitrogen on the herb. liquid nitrogen is go
rate increases on upper income americans. we have accomplished very little about becoming greece or getting out of debt. it is a political victory of the president. i hope we have courage when it comes to the debt ceiling. to fight as what we want as republicans. >> there was a lot of celebration but not anything to do with a deal being made. when house peeker john bone bone came in. republicans gave him a standing ovation . but there is no decision made. >> to chris wallace's name those who talk don't know . those who know don't talk. >> dave: some talk. republicans have made a significant compromise from what i can tell you. republicans have offered $400,000 thres hold for individuals and $550,000 for couples. that is a significant compromise for the republican ideology that did not want to raise taxes on the wealthy. it looks like they are come a long way and there is a $100,00000 . the estate tax and unemployment benefits. and there is all sorts of sequestitration and how they will accomplish thamp harry reid said there is significant distance with the parties. >> here's harr
kind of fiscal order. if not, we will become greece in 20 years. guest: that is a great point to bring up. leaders on both sides of the aisle on capitol hill have made the point that this is not a democratic or republican issue. there is waste to be curbed. what i am hearing from republicans like jon kyl is that you have to make sure america is still able to make its commitments on the world stage. we spoke with a lot of defense- heavy representative, folks from the house armed services committee. they can see that there are cuts to be made. it is just about doing it in a responsible manner rather than across the board cuts, which is less discriminatory than most defense advocates would like. host: we have earl in street louis on our line for democrats. go ahead, - st. louis on our line for democrats. caller: i was just wondering about the defense industrial complex that president eisenhower made the comment about. the defense contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense progra
slide to make us like greece, no longer a viable economic power. >> that was from the program " state of the union, close with this morning. a number of members of the house are point to try to make their way back for votes this evening at 6:30. the house taking up some 13 bills. here is how david hocking's of "congressional quarterly" termed this house session -- " >> nothing on the fiscal cliff, however. we will keep you posted on that. the senate gaveling out shortly for that caucus meeting in particular. taking a look at your twitter messages,-tag is fiscal cliff. -- the hash tag is fiscal cliff. >> also, this twitter message from about 30 minutes ago -- >> helen is in northport. you are on the air. caller: good afternoon. i am glad i lived in a country that allows me to make this phone call and speak my mind. i adhered to the u.s. constitution. rep. ron paul was giving his retirement speech and to his credit, to his credit -- to me makes a lot of sense. i believe him when he says our liberties are being weakened. i am so sorry that they tried to discredit him. he makes a lot of s
greece in the uprising against the turks? [laughter] that, by the way, is a very profound joke. if you are an empire that wants to make sure you play by the rules, it is always good to have a group that is discriminated against and they will go off to build an empire. it is very important. it just came to me with that? if you look out the rest of the democratic world, the spaniards, you name it, they're not exactly gung ho about putting their blood on the line when it comes to pursuing our values. the point, i guess, here is that you always have to have somebody who runs the show. there has to be one of very large power. usually it is anglo-saxon. we are now in a phase of american development with the power that has carried the burden over the last 60 years, as we all know, wants to lead from behind and is retracting from afghanistan, from iraq, and they're now exerting their power from afar and from above. drones above, boots on the ground. i fear if nobody takes on the responsibility of organizing and maintaining, it will not be in the of -- will not be india. >> go ahead, minister.
look for greece to increase tax rates on the wealthy next year. >> what do they say about sequestration's and also changes to entitlement programs? >> interestingly, the debt limit does not address in this proposal. you will collin they proposed a change in the way the debt limit who was released. if you are asking their aides, and they tell us the speaker would be open to increasing the debt limit, but he is sticking to his rule that it must be accompanied by cuts and spending reform equal to or greater than the increase. it could be put on the table for negotiation. they are not laying out specific changes to medicare and medicaid. they want $600 billion in health savings. they mention things that have been mentioned for a year-and-a- half, including the eligibility age for medicare for a number of years and also means testing medicare benefits so they either pay more in premiums or receive less in benefits. the change to social security is also something that has come up repeatedly in these negotiations, which is a change to the way the benefits year- over-year are calculated for the
is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries that our welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employer's. -- employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unem
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)